Climate and Water Systems

Predicting future climate and water conditions

Like the rest of the world, Indiana will be experiencing significant changes to its climate this century, conditions that will affect agriculture and the availability of water throughout the state.

Using state-of-the-art climate and hydro modeling techniques, Environmental Resilience Institute researchers are working to project future climate scenarios and water resources for Indiana in unprecedented detail.

Assessing the Potential for Reducing Peak Flood Flow and Enhancing Summer Base Flow in the St. Joseph River Basin

Traditional solutions to flooding such as river channelization and flood control reservoirs come with well-known environmental costs. A team led by Bill Weeks of IU’s Maurer School of Law and Burke Engineering is using a portion of the St. Joseph River Basin to evaluate alternative methods to managing floodwaters and mitigating drought.

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Downscaling Climate for Indiana

Projecting future climate is essential to prepare for and mitigate environmental change at the global and local scale. A team led by IU Assistant Professor Ben Kravitz is employing a state-of-the-art climate modeling approach to provide multiple future climate scenarios for Indiana along with local, actionable climate data for Indiana residents, business owners, and policymakers.

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STREAMS: Spatial and Temporal River Evolution and Modeling Study

By mid-century Indiana will become wetter, leading to more frequent river flooding, more erosion from hillslopes, and more river migration. To better predict these changes, IU Associate Professor Douglas Edmonds leads a team that is observing and modeling Indiana rivers and hillslopes, with a focus on the White River Basin.

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Sustainable Water Resources in Indiana in a Changing World

How much water will be available to Indiana communities in the future and at what quality? A team led by IU Professor Chen Zhu is investigating water access and sustainability in the state through 2100 under various climate change scenarios.

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