Adaptation Strategies for Protecting Air Quality

Adaptation Strategies for Protecting Air Quality

The adaptation strategies provided below are intended to inform and assist communities in identifying potential alternatives. They are illustrative and are presented to help communities consider possible ways to address current and future climate threats to indoor and outdoor air quality.

Outdoor Air

A warming climate can worsen air quality which can aggravate lung diseases and lead to premature death.

Increases in ground level ozone (tropospheric ozone) pollution levels due to climate change may make it more difficult to attain or maintain ozone standards. This will need to be taken into account when designing effective ozone precursor emission control programs. For more on the causes of ground level ozone, and the difference between ground level ozone and the upper atmospheric ozone (stratospheric ozone) that protects us, see: USEPA's Ozone Pollution webpage.

Climate change may also increase particulate matter (PM) levels through changes in the frequency or intensity of wildfires. The following strategies represent voluntary outdoor air strategies that states and localities can pursue to help adapt to anticipated climate changes. For information pertaining to regulatory requirements for National Ambient Air Quality Standards, please visit the USEPA's Clean Air Act page.

Actions that can improve air quality even as the climate changes include:


Indoor Air

Climate change may worsen indoor air quality through exacerbating existing problems, including from mold or exposure to contaminants. Climate change may also introduce new hazards from altering the frequency or severity of adverse outdoor conditions.

Source Documents

These strategies are adapted from the following existing website: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other federal resources. Please view these strategies in the context provided by the primary source document:

Other Federal Resources:

Other potential adaptation strategies are available from industry organizations, including:

Disclaimer

The adaptation strategies provided are intended to inform and assist communities in identifying potential alternatives. They are illustrative and are presented to help communities consider possible ways to address current and future climate threats to contaminated site management. Read the full disclaimer.

 

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