Invasive Species and Pests

  • Adopt an integrated invasive management strategy or plan that discusses the tradeoffs associated with managing for different species.
  • Monitor the known locations and invasives identified in the plan.

  • Local governments do not always have the regulatory authority or knowledge to deal with invasive species. The department of natural resources can prescribe or implement proper treatment. Check with your state’s department before implementing any measures.

  • Identify invasive species in your area by contacting your state’s department of natural resources, a local university, or local invasive species management group.
  • Conduct an assessment with the assistance of your state’s department of natural resources, a local university, or local invasive species management group. An assessment can refer to a number of activities to gather and evaluate information on the nature, quality, ability, extent, or significance of the invasive species. Learn more from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s guide on assessments for invasive plants.
  • Monitor known locations of invasives within your jurisdiction. By knowing where the invasives are, it can help identify what conditions allow them to be present, where they could spread, and what management could be done to prevent them.

  • Develop programs to regularly apply strategies to remove and control non-native plants in conjunction with organizations or state/federal government departments responsible for invasive management.
  • Offer an invasive species education program to inform residents about plants that are invasive but are still sold commercially. Check with local environmental organizations to find websites and handouts that list management strategies for invasive species present in your area.

Source documents

These strategies are adapted from existing federal and state resources. Please view these strategies in the context provided by the primary source document: